Tuesday, September 15, 2015

Special Nite Cap: Catch Up on Today's Post 9/15/15 #FightForDyett


SPECIAL NITE CAP 

CORPORATE ED REFORM



Kristina Rizga's Mission High and the Twentieth-First Century Schools We Need | John Thompson - Linkis.com
Kristina Rizga's Mission High and the Twentieth-First Century Schools We Need | John Thompson - Linkis.com: Kristina Rizga's Mission High and the Twentieth-First Century Schools We NeedWant to feel 40 to 50 years younger? Then, read Mission High by Kristina Rizga.On virtually every page in Rizga's great book, I relived my idealism of the late 1960s. She tells the story of a school that embodies th
CURMUDGUCATION: Brookings and CCSS Conservative Roots
CURMUDGUCATION: Brookings and CCSS Conservative Roots: Brookings and CCSS Conservative RootsBrookings Institute can always be counted on to come up with some confused coverage of education matters. But this time they have given David Whitman a platform from which to combat the conservative anti-Common Core hordes. Whitman was a reporter for US News who spent five years as Arne Duncan's speechwrite
Guiding Principles on Teaching, Learning, and Reform | Larry Cuban on School Reform and Classroom Practice
Guiding Principles on Teaching, Learning, and Reform | Larry Cuban on School Reform and Classroom Practice: Guiding Principles on Teaching, Learning, and ReformFrom time to time readers will ask me what I believe should be done about teaching, learning, and school reform. They usually preface their request with words such as: “Hey, Larry, you have been a constant critic of existing reforms. You ha
School Closure: A Tragic Turnaround Strategy | janresseger
School Closure: A Tragic Turnaround Strategy | janresseger: School Closure: A Tragic Turnaround StrategyChicago’s Dyett High School, which had been phased out by the school district beginning in 2012, will be re-opened as an open-enrollment, arts-focused high school for 550 students.  The school was slated for closure following the graduation of 13 students last June at the end of the phase-out pr
Florida’s big charter school problem (which Jeb Bush manages not to talk about) - The Washington Post
Florida’s big charter school problem (which Jeb Bush manages not to talk about) - The Washington Post: Florida’s big charter school problem (which Jeb Bush manages not to talk about)In 2011, the Miami Herald ran a special report called “Cashing In On Kids — Florida’s Charter Schools: big money, little oversight” that reviewed the state’s 15-year charter expansion and found that after spending bill
Best Cities for Teachers
Best Cities for Teachers: Best Cities for Teachersby Andrew PentisAfter earning their graduate degrees, aspiring teachers head in all kinds of directions, depending on what, who and where they want to teach. Some seek the inner-city challenge, the suburban support or perhaps a school with a greater mission. For these professionals, unlike those in many other careers, the best city to be in a class
Children need teachers to teach them - not computers, says the OECD | ZDNet
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Sacramento steps toward a better ethics policy | The Sacramento Bee
Sacramento steps toward a better ethics policy | The Sacramento Bee: Sacramento steps toward a better ethics policyThe Sacramento City Council will vote Tuesday night on a plan to direct its staff to create a detailed ethics package, a step that is worthy of encouragement and support.The goal would be for the components to come back to the council in three to six months for votes.Mayor Kevin Johns
Carl Cohn to oversee California’s school district spending
Carl Cohn to oversee California’s school district spending: Carl Cohn to oversee California’s school district spendingCLAREMONT >> Carl Cohn’s the man who’s going to give report cards to California’s public school districts and charter schools.In 2013, Gov. Jerry Brown announced a sweeping change to how California’s public K-12 schools are funded.The Local Control Funding Formula replaces the coun

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Special Nite Cap: Catch Up on Today's Post 9/14/15 #FightForDyett
SPECIAL NITE CAP CORPORATE ED REFORMThe Education Reform Oligarchy & Their School Choice Conversation - The Crucial VoiceThe Crucial VoiceThe Education Reform Oligarchy & Their School Choice Conversation - The Crucial VoiceThe Crucial Voice: The Education Reform Oligarchy & Their School Choice ConversationThe education reform oligarchy of the 80’s had a school choice conversation —at l





Kristina Rizga's Mission High and the Twentieth-First Century Schools We Need | John Thompson - Linkis.com

Kristina Rizga's Mission High and the Twentieth-First Century Schools We Need | John Thompson - Linkis.com:

Kristina Rizga's Mission High and the Twentieth-First Century Schools We Need



Want to feel 40 to 50 years younger? Then, read Mission High by Kristina Rizga.
On virtually every page in Rizga's great book, I relived my idealism of the late 1960s. She tells the story of a school that embodies the ideals which schools should exemplify. Schools (and our society) were not as good when I was a student. But, we believed that the day would come when schools like San Francisco's Mission High would be the norm.
Rizga describes the dignity, the dynamism, and the wisdom of the diverse students at the high-challenge school. In doing so, she reminds us why integration works. Bring all types of students together with all type of adults, and awesome things happen.

Maria, whose auntie was murdered by the gang MS-13 in El Salvador, originally struggled to write two paragraphs. Maria's teachers recognized her as "an intellect battling to find its voice." They helped her to build on her tenacity, to write and rewrite research papers, and author sophisticated analyses such as her essay onMendez v. Westminster.
Darrell had a reading disability, and like many African American students, he did not see himself as a good test-taker. But challenging lessons, such as analyzing U.S. foreign policy in Latin America, taught him how to achieve "the highest high," a "sense of pride in his own thoughts and ideas ... [that] fed his resilience." Not surprisingly, lessons on the Tulsa Race Riot of 1921 worked with students of all races just like it did for my kids in Oklahoma City.
Rizga recounts the backgrounds and the distributive leadership of Eric Guthertz, Mission High's principal (whose guidance is described here), of social studies teacher Robert Roth and language arts teacher Pirette McKamey. They treat each student as an individual. They build on students' strengths; they don't just remediate weaknesses.
These progressive educators teach a complete curriculum, not just bubbling in the Kristina Rizga's Mission High and the Twentieth-First Century Schools We Need | John Thompson - Linkis.com:

CURMUDGUCATION: Brookings and CCSS Conservative Roots

CURMUDGUCATION: Brookings and CCSS Conservative Roots:

Brookings and CCSS Conservative Roots





Brookings Institute can always be counted on to come up with some confused coverage of education matters. But this time they have given David Whitman a platform from which to combat the conservative anti-Common Core hordes. Whitman was a reporter for US News who spent five years as Arne Duncan's speechwriter before jumping on Peter Cunningham's $12 million Core-boosting PR website.

Whitman is here to try to address what has to be one of the Obama administration's great frustration-- here they are implementing a set of education policies that are an extension of conservative GOP policies from years before, and suddenly conservative Republicans are lambasting it. It's like Nixon going to China and being called a Commie sympathizer by people on the left.

"The Surprising Roots of the Common Core:How Conservatives Gave Rise to ‘Obamacore’" is a challenging read, containing a pretty thorough look at the conservative pedigree of the Core that is wrapped in lots of heavily balonified conclusions.

Intro

Everybody keeps saying that conservatives hate the Core, and Whitman has the media quotes to prove it. But that's just not fair. In fact, Whitman says with the kind of shameless straight face that will exemplify his work, that the Obama-Duncan Department of Education "has substantially shrunkthe federal role in advocating for anything resembling a model national curriculum, national standards, and national assessments." Which kind of ignores the whole "creating waivers that allow the Obama-Duncan department to effectively write law from the USED office" thing.

Whitman says that CCSS is out there still thriving in classrooms precisely because this administration didn't repeat the federal overreach mistakes of its predecessors, which is just... well, Not True 
CURMUDGUCATION: Brookings and CCSS Conservative Roots:





Mrs. Jobs Antes Up


Laurene Powell Jobs came out of the Wharton School of Business with an MBA and went to work for Merrill Lynch and Goldman Sachs. She started a health food business and went to Stanford's business grad school. And then she married Steve Jobs.

She's no lightweight. She's spent time working in various philanthropic undertakings, includingCollege Track, a group that works to support "underserved" students in getting into, and through, college and they haven't done poorly. Her husband died after a long bout with pancreatic cancer at age 56, which is too young to die from such a crappy disease no matter how much money you do or don't have.

Jobs is now responsible for a huge pile of money, mostly as part of a trust that owns, in addition to a giant chunk of Apple, 7.3% of the Walt Disney Corporation.

Mrs. Jobs is rich, and powerful, and she would now like to fix schools.

The Good News

Jobs has said, “We want to make high schools back into the great equalizers they were meant to be."

Her new initiative is a huge grant competition called XQ: The Super School Project


The Super School Project is an open call to reimagine and design the next American high school. In 

Mrs. Jobs Antes Up

Guiding Principles on Teaching, Learning, and Reform | Larry Cuban on School Reform and Classroom Practice

Guiding Principles on Teaching, Learning, and Reform | Larry Cuban on School Reform and Classroom Practice:

Guiding Principles on Teaching, Learning, and Reform





From time to time readers will ask me what I believe should be done about teaching, learning, and school reform. They usually preface their request with words such as: “Hey, Larry, you have been a constant critic of existing reforms. You have written about schools not being businesses and have pointed out the flaws in policymaker assumptions and thinking about reform. And you have been skeptical about the worth of new computer devices, software, and online instruction in promoting better teaching and faster learning. So instead of always being a critic just tell us what you think ought to be done.”
Trained as a historian of education and knowledgeable about each surge of school reform to improve teaching and learning over the past century, I cannot offer specific programs for school boards, superintendents, principals, teachers, parents, and voters to consider. Why? Because context is all-important. I know of no reform, no program, no technology that is context-free. The setting matters. So suggesting this program or that reform for all math classes or urban districts or elementary schools is impossible. But there are principles I embrace that guide my thinking about teaching, learning, and reform. These principles set the direction yet need to be adapted to different settings. These principles come out of my five decades of being a teacher, administrator, and scholar. These principles come out of my school experiences and as a site-based researcher. Most readers will be familiar with what I say. No surprises here. But these principles do steer my thinking about teaching, learning, and reform.
  1. No single way of teaching works best with all students. Because students differ in motivation, interests, and abilities, using a wide repertoire of approaches in lessons and units is essential. Direct instruction, small groups, whole-group guided discussions, student choice, worksheets, research papers, project-based instruction, online software, etc., etc., etc. need to be in the tool kit of every teacher. There are, of course, reformers and reform-minded researchers who try to alter how teachers teach and the content of their instruction from afar such as Common Core State Standards, the newest version of New Math, New Science, New History, or similar curricular inventions. I support such initiatives as long as they rely upon a broad repertoire of teacher approaches to content and skills. When the reforms do not, when they ask teachers to adhere to a certain best way of teaching (e.g., project-based teaching, direct instruction) regardless of context, I oppose such reforms.
  2. Small and slow changes in classroom practice occur often. Fundamental and rapid changes in practice seldom happen.While well-intentioned reformers seek to basically change how teachers teach reading, math, science, and history, such 180 degree changes in the Guiding Principles on Teaching, Learning, and Reform | Larry Cuban on School Reform and Classroom Practice:

School Closure: A Tragic Turnaround Strategy | janresseger

School Closure: A Tragic Turnaround Strategy | janresseger:

School Closure: A Tragic Turnaround Strategy





Chicago’s Dyett High School, which had been phased out by the school district beginning in 2012, will be re-opened as an open-enrollment, arts-focused high school for 550 students.  The school was slated for closure following the graduation of 13 students last June at the end of the phase-out process. A dozen protesters, led by Jitu Brown of Chicago’s Kenwood Oakland Community Association, are responsible for the re-opening of Dyett as a neighborhood high school.  Since August 17, the protesters have conducted a hunger strike to protest the school’s closure.
As the Chicago Public Schools capitulated by agreeing to re-open the school, Jitu Brown commented: “We are happy the school is opening as a neighborhood CPS-run school.  All is not lost.  But what we want is what the community demanded.”  Earlier this year, when the school district had issued a request for proposals (RFP), citizens of the neighborhood had submitted a proposal for a school with a focus on green energy and global leadership, with support from the University of Illinois at Chicago’s School of Education and the Chicago Botanical Gardens, which Chicago Catalyst reports “had agreed to partner with Dyett under the proposal submitted by activists.”
CPS has declared that the school will have an arts, not a science, focus, in honor of the school’s namesake, Walter Henri Dyett, a DuSable High School music teacher known for educating a number of Chicago’s great jazz musicians.  Although the school district described its agreement to re-open Dyett as a high school with an arts focus as “a compromise” (intended to end the hunger strike), the protesters continue to declare that their hunger strike is about something much larger—the autocratic, top-down management of a school district that has persistently disdained the Chicago neighborhood communities the public schools are said to serve. While Dyett High School will re-open to serve the neighborhood, the District’s leaders ignored the wishes the community has been expressing through the hunger strike and that they framed several months ago in a formal proposal.
School closure is one of the four approved, top-down “turnaround” plans prescribed by the federal No Child Left Behind Act for schools unable to raise test scores after several years. The implication of the “turnaround” language, of course, implies that somehow closure will inspire rebirth, but too often school closure has meant not only the death of the school but also the demise of the neighborhood for which the school was the institutional anchor.
School closure was a favorite plan of New York’s mayor Michael Bloomberg and his chancellor, Joel Klein, writes Jelani Cobb in an extraordinary New Yorker profile of New York’s Jamaica High School, closed last June.  Over the years Bloomberg and Klein closed 74 schools.  In 2010, Chicago’s mayor Rahm Emmanuel and his public schools CEO Barbara Byrd Bennett closed 50 schools.  Adrian Fenty, Washington, D.C.’s mayor, and his superintendent Michelle Rhee closed two dozen schools—one of the factors that is said to have precipitated his defeat in a subsequent election.  Quoting the phraseology used by Joel Klein to justify New York City’s school closures and the co-location of a number of small high schools into the buildings that had housed the comprehensive high schools, Cobb explains: “The real problem was that the schools had ‘started getting many kids who were low-performing and entering School Closure: A Tragic Turnaround Strategy | janresseger:

Florida’s big charter school problem (which Jeb Bush manages not to talk about) - The Washington Post

Florida’s big charter school problem (which Jeb Bush manages not to talk about) - The Washington Post:

Florida’s big charter school problem (which Jeb Bush manages not to talk about)




In 2011, the Miami Herald ran a special report called “Cashing In On Kids — Florida’s Charter Schools: big money, little oversight” that reviewed the state’s 15-year charter expansion and found that after spending billions in public funds to support these schools, the educational reform had “turned into one of the region’s fastest-growing industries, backed by real-estate developers and promoted by politicians” with little oversight.  It said in part:
Charter schools have become a parallel school system unto themselves, a system controlled largely by for-profit management companies and private landlords — one and the same, in many cases — and rife with insider deals and potential conflicts of interest.
In many instances, the educational mission of the school clashes with the profit-making mission of the management company, a Miami Herald examination of South Florida’s charter school industry has found. Consider:
• Some schools have ceded almost total control of their staff and finances to for-profit management companies that decide how the schools’ money is spent …
• Many management companies also control the land and buildings used by the schools — sometimes collecting more than 25 percent of a school’s revenue in lease payments, in addition to management fees …
• Charter schools often rely on loans from management companies or other insiders to stay afloat, making charter school governing boards beholden to the managers they oversee …
The story made the point of noting that Florida’s charter school laws “are aimed more at promoting the schools than policing them, leaving school districts with few ways to enforce the rules.”
Fast forward to 2015. Has anything changed? Not much, according to a new exposé on Florida charter schools, this one done by the Sun-Sentinelwith the headline: “Forida’s Charter Schools UNSUPERVISED — Taxpayers, students lose when school operators exploit weak laws.”
It says that in the past five years, 56 charter schools in South Florida have closed because of mismanagement and/or other issues, and that “a handful” of them  “owe a total of at least $1 million in public education money to local school districts” but because districts have a hard time documenting Florida’s big charter school problem (which Jeb Bush manages not to talk about) - The Washington Post:

Best Cities for Teachers

Best Cities for Teachers:

Best Cities for Teachers

After earning their graduate degrees, aspiring teachers head in all kinds of directions, depending on what, who and where they want to teach. Some seek the inner-city challenge, the suburban support or perhaps a school with a greater mission. For these professionals, unlike those in many other careers, the best city to be in a classroom could be the worst for another. It just depends. At ValuePenguin, however, we classify the best city as one that scores well in three metrics that all teachers care about: median salary, cost of living and location quotient. 

Best Five Cities for Teachers

Of the 274 cities reporting data for their teachers, these five earned our best score. Each landed on the list for a variety of reasons. More on our methodology below.

1. Salinas, Calif.

With the country’s highest location quotient, a metric that belies a city’s demand for teachers, Salinas takes the top spot. Having the study’s fifth-highest annual average salary, $78,590, for the profession didn’t hurt either. Famous author John Steinbeck is required reading in schools here, as is a visit to the National Steinbeck Center on the city’s Main Street.

2. Valdosta, Ga.

Unlike the other four teacher-friendly cities among the top five, Valdosta is 7 % more affordable to live in than the average American city. Augusta (No. 17), Albany (22) and Warner Robbins (24) joined Valdosta as particularly teacher-friendly Georgia cities. Located in the extreme southern section of the state, it is home to 10 schools, 650 certified employees and 8,000-plus students.

3. Charleston, S.C. 

Charleston scored well in each of the four metrics we considered, most highly in annual average salary, reporting $68,620, or 54 % higher than the study’s average. Charleston. Which combined with North Charleston and Summerville in its reporting to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, is a two-hour drive southeast of the capital, Columbia. Education programs in the state overall, from kindergarten to college, have received millions of dollars from the appropriately-named South Carolina Education Lottery.

4. San Diego, Calif.

With the fifth-most teaching positions in the country (7,470), San Diego (and data-reporting partners Carlsbad and San Marcos) finished in our penultimate spot in the pecking order. Only Chicago (18,700), New York (12,980), Los Angeles (12,970) and Washington, D.C. (7,550) can say they more employed. San Diego instructors have the option to join one of two powerful unions, the California Teachers Association or the California Federation of Teachers. According to a San Diego Union-Tribune article based on “Transparent California” data, more than 500 teachers in San Diego County make more than $100,000 in 2013.

5. Oakland, Calif.

The third California city to crack the top five – and one of eight to be ranked in the top 30 (see below) – Oakland narrowly beat out Detroit for this slot in spite of the fact that it’s 44 percent more expensive than average to live in its metro statistical area, which covers Fremont and Hayward. Oakland has the benefit of being in close proximity to some of the U.S. News & World Report’s best graduate schools for aspiring teachers: The University of California at Berkeley is five miles away, and Stanford University is about 35. Working against Oakland is that our study deemed it to be the least safe city in California.

Population Breakdown

Although we adjusted for population in our rankings, it is still difficult to compare a small city to a large one. To account for this fact, we separated the safest cities into three categories: cities with populations less than 100,000 people, midsize cities with populations between 100,000 and 500,000, and larger cities with populations greater than 500,000. Here are our findings:

Top 30 Cities for Teachers 

RankCity Average Salary JobsLocation QuotientCost of LivingScore
1Salinas, CA$78,5902,7008.481208
2Valdosta, GA$61,1405605.599336
3Charleston, SC$68,6201,3802.2410144
4San Diego, CA$59,4507,4702.8315245
5Oakland, CA$59,8004,4602.1814456
6Detroit, MI$54,2904,2402.968459
7Washington, DC$60,8007,5501.5915775
8Fayetteville, NC$53,4709003.629475
9Lawton, OK$58,6302102.578677
10Warren, MI$60,1703,3001.459578
11Kalamazoo, MI$53,6406502.478787
12Gulfport, MS$56,7904302.149193
13Jacksonville, NC$52,0304505.059996
14Crestview, FL$60,8302401.56101103
15Trenton, NJ$52,6909702.16106106
16Fresno, CA$52,2601,3802.08101107
17Augusta, GA$79,5404801.1791107
18Providence, RI$72,7801,1701.06118118
19Los Angeles, CA$52,65012,9701.60144118
20New York, NY$58,01012,9801.21168118
21Wichita, KS$50,0801,3202.2787120
22Albany, GA$53,9002001.7488122
23San Francisco, CA$66,2602,2401.03200124
24Warner Robins, GA$59,7201501.3489126
25Riverside, CA$56,9403,0001.20109128
26Elizabethtown, KY$50,3502502.7693131
27Kingsport, TN$50,9104501.9789134
28Poughkeepsie, NY$79,2204800.97119137
29San Jose, CA$55,1202,3201.19187141
30Bridgeport, CT$65,7108100.96143143

What’s It Like Teaching in… ?

20. New York City, N.Y. 

Dana Humphrey | Adjunct Professor | The Fashion Institute of Technology 
“What is interesting is I have students from all walks of life. Sometimes they come from far away, such as Mexico, Japan, Chicago or Kansas. New York City is so accessible from nearby places such as Long Island, New Jersey, D.C. and Philly as well so we usually have many different zip codes represented in the classroom.”

37. Chicago, Ill.

Ciara Newby | Assistant Headteacher | British International School of Chicago
“There are some great teacher discounts, and it is free to get into the Art Institute of Chicago.”

109. Rochester, N.Y.

Steve Maier | Teacher | Rochester Institute of Technology
“I have worked at a small community college in Texas and now a large private college in New York. The community college helped me to really connect to the students. Some of them were coworkers of mine as well. I learned to have a good rapport with them and that has helped me to do the same with the students at RIT.”

141. Charlotte, N.C.

Kelly Culver | English Teacher | Lake Norman High School
“I work in a school that caters to the higher socioeconomic classes. Many of my students' families are independently wealthy. Coming from urban and rural environments, I was unaware of the challenges facing me here. It's a bit disconcerting to see students driving cars worth as much as my house. In the end though, they are just teenagers and they come with the same host of dramas that all teenagers come with.”

144. Santa Fe, N.M.

Monique Anair | Professor | Santa Fe Community College
“Diversity and extreme poverty (are characteristics here). Santa Fe is known for its art and wealth, but the students who come to the city college are 75 % Hispanic and low-income, and most of our students are first-time college students. That energy permeates Sante Fe Community College. And the faculty… people want to live here, so many amazing faculty take pay cuts and make sacrifices to be in New Mexico. And that wealth and knowledge lands in our classrooms.”

Milford, Mich.

Cindy McKinley | English Instructor | Oakland Community College
“I teach only part-time at my community college but they pay me very well, about $50 per hour.”

New Britain, Conn.

Daniel Blanchard | Teacher | New Britain High School
“I work in the largest inner city high school in Connecticut. We have real poverty issues that are extremely sad. However, on the other end, some of these students will spend some real quality time with you and develop life-long relationships with you. When they know that you are there to help them, they open up to you.”

Richmond, Ky.

Joel Cormier | Associate Professor | Eastern Kentucky University
“The Midwest is unique especially when you are at a regional college. You will find yourself wondering why the local people don’t respect the economic impact of the university as they cheer on all the sports teams of the big conglomerate state school in which they never attended.”

Methodology

These were the three key questions we asked in coming up with the list. 
1. What can teachers earn in the city?  
We ranked the best cities for teachers based on the median annual pay. Income is likely the most important factor people consider when starting their career or relocating elsewhere. A high salary in an expensive city, however, may be less attractive than a lower salary in an affordable town. Our next metric takes affordability into consideration.
2. How affordable is it to live in this city?  
Now that we have the median salary, we’ll look next at the cost of living. The cost of living is a measure of how far earnings can be stretched. Cities with lower cost of living index numbers ranked higher in our study. For example, the average city is benchmarked at 100. A city with a cost of living index of 188, such as Honolulu, would mean that generally speaking, living expenses are 88 percent more expensive compared to the average city.
3. What is the location quotient for teachers in the city?  
A place with a high median salary and low cost of living may seem perfect, but job opportunities may be limited. Our third factor accounts for this by favoring cities with high location quotients. Location quotient measures the concentration of teachers in an area as a percentage of all occupations, and then compares that to the national average. We interpret a higher location quotient to mean a relatively higher demand for a teacher’s services.

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