Saturday, August 1, 2015

Special Nite Cap: Catch Up on Today's Post 8/1/15


SPECIAL NITE CAP 

CORPORATE ED REFORM



Schools Matter: National Journal's Rose Colored Reporting on Texas CREDO Study
Schools Matter: National Journal's Rose Colored Reporting on Texas CREDO Study: National Journal's Rose Colored Reporting on Texas CREDO StudyWhen the mainstream Washington media finds news on low test scores among public schools, they love to accentuate the negative and to ignore the positive.  On the other hand, when new research about charter schools that can't be ignored comes to the corporate
(What’s So Special ‘Bout) Rigor, Grit and Standardized Testing? | WagTheDog
(What’s So Special ‘Bout) Rigor, Grit and Standardized Testing? | WagTheDog: (What’s So Special ‘Bout) Rigor, Grit and Standardized Testing?In his 1979 song, “(What’s So Funny “Bout) Peace, Love and Understanding?” Elvis Costello wonders;So where are the strong And who are the trusted? And where is the harmony? Sweet harmony.‘Cause each time I feel it slippin’ away, just makes me wanna cry. What’s
Sixth Anniversary of This Blog | Larry Cuban on School Reform and Classroom Practice
Sixth Anniversary of This Blog | Larry Cuban on School Reform and Classroom Practice: Sixth Anniversary of This BlogDear Readers,This post marks my sixth anniversary as a blogger. I want to thank those readers who regularly read my twice-weekly posts, those who have dipped into them occasionally, those who have subscribed to the post, and finally those who have taken the time to write thoughtful c
New guidelines for AP history: Are they still 'unpatriotic'? - Yahoo News
New guidelines for AP history: Are they still 'unpatriotic'? - Yahoo News: New guidelines for AP history: Are they still 'unpatriotic'?Some conservatives argued that last year's guidelines for AP US history courses in high school were unpatriotic. The new guidelines make an effort to be 'unpolitical.'In the wake of a partisan uproar last year, the 2015 guidelines for the Advanced Placement United
Georgia schools investigation: Too many kids are getting sent to special schools.
Georgia schools investigation: Too many kids are getting sent to special schools.: Georgia Sends Kids With Disabilities and Behavior Problems to Special Schools. That’s Segregation.After a psychiatric evaluation and years of reported issues, Clarence, the lovable problem child in Tracy Kidder’s Among Schoolchildren, gets shipped off to finish fifth grade in the mysterious and ominously named “alph

YESTERDAY

Ed Next: If Feds Allow Opt Out, “One Cannot Assess School Performance” | deutsch29
Ed Next: If Feds Allow Opt Out, “One Cannot Assess School Performance” | deutsch29: Ed Next: If Feds Allow Opt Out, “One Cannot Assess School Performance”On July 28, 2015, Education Next editor-in-chief Paul Peterson and executive editor Martin West published an article entitled, “Public Supports Testing, Opposes Opt Out, Opposes Federal Intervention.”In their article, Peterson and West discuss th
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The Argument For Adding Consent To The Sex-Ed Curriculum
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Special Nite Cap: Catch Up on Today's Post 7/31/15
SPECIAL NITE CAP CORPORATE ED REFORM4LAKids - ELI’S COMIN’ …better hide your heart girl4LAKids - some of the news that doesn't fit: ELI’S COMIN’ …better hide your heart girl:ELI’S COMIN’ …better hide your heart girlMESSAGE DATED JULY 8 RECEIVED BY  CORTINES VAPA HIGH SCHOOL/CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL #9 PARENTS ON JULY 31ST…and where’s Dr. Vladovic on the letterhead?Eli’s Comin’ meanings: from Urban Dict




Schools Matter: National Journal's Rose Colored Reporting on Texas CREDO Study

Schools Matter: National Journal's Rose Colored Reporting on Texas CREDO Study:

National Journal's Rose Colored Reporting on Texas CREDO Study






When the mainstream Washington media finds news on low test scores among public schools, they love to accentuate the negative and to ignore the positive.  On the other hand, when new research about charter schools that can't be ignored comes to the corporate editorial offices, the spinners go to work to do just the opposite.  As in the latest coverage by National Journal of the recent CREDO study on Texas charter schools. The study's press release begins with this: "The results of CREDO's Texas report shows that on average, charter schools in Texas show less progress in both reading and mathematics compared to their district school peers."

Below are the study's main findings released July 22, 2015: 



Now there is a star beside the second bullet point because this is the only possible good news in the CREDO report, and it is exactly the one that National Journal (NJ) embellishes to promote the kind of lockdown paternalist charters embraced by corporate and political elites.  NJ's headline reads, "Charter Schools Are Especially Good for ELL Students."

Not surprisingly, NJ's main source to spin their story to benefit segregated charter schools is Steve Mancini, the mouthpiece for KIPP, Inc.  Steve can always be counted on to offer an Orwellian response to any bad news about any of the chain gangs in the No Excuses charter system. Loss is victory, weakness is power, ignorance is knowledge, etc.

The problem with NJ's story about the "good news" for ELLs is that their turd polishing brings attention to 
Schools Matter: National Journal's Rose Colored Reporting on Texas CREDO Study:

(What’s So Special ‘Bout) Rigor, Grit and Standardized Testing? | WagTheDog

(What’s So Special ‘Bout) Rigor, Grit and Standardized Testing? | WagTheDog:

(What’s So Special ‘Bout) Rigor, Grit and Standardized Testing?





In his 1979 song, “(What’s So Funny “Bout) Peace, Love and Understanding?” Elvis Costello wonders;
So where are the strong 
And who are the trusted? 
And where is the harmony? 
Sweet harmony.
‘Cause each time I feel it slippin’ away, just makes me wanna cry. 
What’s so funny ’bout peace love & understanding?
Imagine how different education reform and the Common Core State Standards would be if Elvis Costello had been their chief architect and lead writer rather than David Coleman, who infamously declared in April, 2011 at a NY State Department of Education Presentation;
As you grow up in this world you realize people really don’t give a shit about what you feel or what you think.
Rigor vs. Vigor
The Common Core’s exclusive focus on rigorous math and ELA standards may be well intended, but these standards fail to prepare students for the diverse expectations and vigorous challenges of post-secondary learning and working.
According to the Common Core web site;
The standards are: Based on rigorous content and application 
(What’s So Special ‘Bout) Rigor, Grit and Standardized Testing? | WagTheDog:

Sixth Anniversary of This Blog | Larry Cuban on School Reform and Classroom Practice

Sixth Anniversary of This Blog | Larry Cuban on School Reform and Classroom Practice:

Sixth Anniversary of This Blog



Dear Readers,
This post marks my sixth anniversary as a blogger. I want to thank those readers who regularly read my twice-weekly posts, those who have dipped into them occasionally, those who have subscribed to the post, and finally those who have taken the time to write thoughtful comments. Over one million viewers from around the world have clicked on to the blog since August 2009. Not exactly viral but, for me, most gratifying.
For the 720 posts I have written since 2009, I have followed three rules:
  1. Write about 800 words.
  2. Write clearly on school reform and classroom practice.
  3. Take a position and back it up with evidence.
For anyone who blogs or writes often knows that sticking to these rules has been no easy task. Yet after six years, it has been very satisfying. I remain highly motivated to write about policymakers, administrators, teachers, parents, and students–all who inhabit the policy-to-practice continuum–and all who in different ways, with varied ideas, seek to improve schooling.
To me, writing is a form of teaching and learning. The learning part comes from figuring out what I want to say on a topic, researching it, drafting a post, and then revising it more times than I would ever admit so that the post says what I want it to say. Learning also has come from the surprises and mistakes I have found in the suggestions and comments readers post—“Did I really say that?” “Oops!, Sorry, “Wow! that is an unexpected view on what I said,” or “I had never considered that point.”
The teaching part comes from putting my ideas out there in a clearly expressed logical argument, buttressed by evidence, for others who may agree or disagree about an issue I am deeply interested in. As in all teaching, planning enters the picture in how I frame the central question I want readers to consider and how I put the argument and evidence together in a clear, coherent, and crisp blog of about 800 words.
Because of my background as a high school teacher, administrator, policymaker, and historian of education I often give a question or issue its historical context. I Sixth Anniversary of This Blog | Larry Cuban on School Reform and Classroom Practice:

New guidelines for AP history: Are they still 'unpatriotic'? - Yahoo News

New guidelines for AP history: Are they still 'unpatriotic'? - Yahoo News:

New guidelines for AP history: Are they still 'unpatriotic'?

Some conservatives argued that last year's guidelines for AP US history courses in high school were unpatriotic. The new guidelines make an effort to be 'unpolitical.'





In the wake of a partisan uproar last year, the 2015 guidelines for the Advanced Placement United States history curriculum released Thursday feature a more-balanced look at the country, academics say. The guidelines go into effect immediately. 
The AP program, which allows high school students to take college-level courses for credit, is administered by The College Board, a private nonprofit corporation. Political conservatives argued that the 2014 guidelines for US history had an anti-American slant that highlighted wrongdoing and downplayed the achievements of the American people.
The most visible clash came last fall in Colorado's Jefferson County, where the school board proposed to review the course framework in order to ensure that it gave a sufficiently positive view of American achievements. Thousands of students and teachers walked out of classrooms and lined the streets in protest.
The protests in the Rocky Mountain State weren’t an isolated occurrence, with pundits, lawmakers, and even the Republican National Committee weighing in.
In Texas, lawmakers threatened to veto AP US history courses, and Ben Carson, a 2016 Republican presidential hopeful, said that students who completed the class with the new guidelines would be “ready to sign up for ISIS,” a common acronym for the Islamic State.
Liberals might see the new guidelines as The College Board caving in to pressure, but the intent was to move the course away from partisanship, says Jeremy Stern, an independent historian who was consulted for the revision.
He saw the right-wing attacks as “overblown.” In Jefferson County, action by the students and teachers stopped the proposal from going forward, and now the three school board members who supported the measure face a recall vote.
History needs to deal with unpleasant topics as much as high achievements, Mr. Stern says. “You can’t just ignore past injustices because you don’t like them.”
But the 2014 guidelines weren't balanced, he suggests. There were “serious problems” with the old version of the framework, which in some cases didn't put American injustices into a broader framework.
For example, presenting British colonialism without a larger discussion about the abuses of European colonialism in general. 
For some teachers, the 2014 guidelines were successful precisely because they did add at least some level of context. For years, teachers have complained that the AP US history course guidelines lacked detail. That made it difficult to know what they should focus on.
While critics of the 2014 framework focused on the exclusion of specific historical figures, Davis Burton, a teacher at Southmoore High School in Oklahoma who has taught AP US history for 13 years, said the 2014 guidelines were a “triple-jump forward.”
“As a teacher, I never felt like the old framework was particularly helpful,” Mr. Burton says. “It might have Ben Franklin in it, but there wouldn't be anything about what Ben Franklin means in the larger context of American history.”
The new 2015 guidelines now reflect more the idea of the unique characteristics of the United States, including the fact that the majority of the country is made up of immigrants, says Jon Butler, an emeritus professor of American Studies at Yale University. Most of the changes he saw were tightening up language and removing elements that might be confusing.
The guidelines are not a set curriculum. They are meant to guide teachers in general subject matter. Stern sees the new guidelines as an improvement.
“This is a major success for an unpolitical look at American history,” Stern says.
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Georgia schools investigation: Too many kids are getting sent to special schools.

Georgia schools investigation: Too many kids are getting sent to special schools.:

Georgia Sends Kids With Disabilities and Behavior Problems to Special Schools. That’s Segregation.



After a psychiatric evaluation and years of reported issues, Clarence, the lovable problem child in Tracy Kidder’s Among Schoolchildren, gets shipped off to finish fifth grade in the mysterious and ominously named “alpha class.” The prisonlike alpha class is populated with other problem children and located in another building that Clarence’s current teacher—who doesn’t want him to leave—is not even allowed to visit.
Kidder’s nonfiction book was published in 1989. A year later—25 years ago this week, in fact—the Americans With Disabilities Act was passed, which promised, among other things, full access to public schools for disabled students, in tandem with the 1975 Individuals With Disabilities Education Act, which more explicitly protected special-needs students in schools.
Clarence wasn’t disabled, just extremely disruptive. And in the years since Kidder's book—thanks in part to the passage of these two laws—the practice of simply getting rid of students who take up too much of their teachers’ time has fallen out of official favor. But as a recent Department of Justice investigation of Georgia schools revealed, shunting kids off into separate and unequal schools is still happening all over the country. According to a ProPublica report of the investigation:
Georgia has been illegally and unnecessarily segregating thousands of students with behavioral issues and disabilities, isolating them in run-down facilities and providing them with subpar education. … [W]hat the Justice Department found in Georgia is something that persists across the country: Schools continue to inappropriately segregate students with a range of behavioral needs and disabilities.
The Justice Department found that Georgia schools, rather than trying to work with students in a mainstream setting, were quick to place them in shoddy second-rate ones with inadequate facilities, many of which had been used for black students during Jim Crow. These practices fly in the face both of the IDEA, which mandates that students be educated in the “least restrictive environment,” and of the ADA, which requires that all public facilities serve disabled people in the “most integrated setting.”
And because students often received these placements after even minor behavioral infractions, like using inappropriate language with a teacher, many of the kids who ended up in the Georgia Network for Educational and Therapeutic Support should have stayed in their neighborhood schools but been given more mental healthGeorgia schools investigation: Too many kids are getting sent to special schools.:

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