Thursday, April 21, 2011

Hechinger Report | For many adults, basic-skills classes are the best hope for a brighter future

Hechinger Report | For many adults, basic-skills classes are the best hope for a brighter future

For many adults, basic-skills classes are the best hope for a brighter future

Ana, a 52 year old cafeteria cashier, completes an ESOL workbook exercise on the board at Harvard University’s Bridge Program. (Photo by Sarah Butrymowicz)

BOSTON— Across the U.S., thousands of workers stuck in low-paying jobs are trying to get a leg up through free basic-skills classes that train them in everything from elementary math to basic literacy.

Mya Maw, a 52-year-old Burmese immigrant, longs for a stable office job in Boston, where she’s raising twin teenage daughters and washing dishes at a hotel. To help reach her goal, she spends most mornings sitting through two hours of English or computer instruction, taking advantage of free basic-skills classes that are a small but significant part of a fractured U.S. adult-education system.

“I want to improve step by step,” said Maw, who dropped out of ESL courses that were too expensive for her in

Public Policy Blogger: NCLB reauthorization. Is there common ground?

Public Policy Blogger: NCLB reauthorization. Is there common ground?

NCLB reauthorization. Is there common ground?

The fate of former President George W. Bush's baby, the No Child Left Behind Act, is unclear these days. Although crafted through bi-partisan action to much fanfare, the way it played out "on the ground" provoked controversy from the start. It's now unpopular with most everyone. Teachers, principals, superintendents, school boards, parents, children's advocates, and politicians on both sides of the aisle. Some never liked it and use its original name, the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. And although everyone agrees it needs to be fixed, few can agree how best to do it. The disagreements seem to come down to how one defines the role of the federal government in public education. And we all know that's a touchy subject these days. But, I still believe there is common ground. If everyone starts genuinely and respectfully listening to one other. And if observers and commentators acknowledge the complexities and nuances of the politics involved.

In today's Washington Post, conservative columnist George F. Will writes about Rep. John Kline (R-MN) and his new duty as chair of the House Education and the Workforce Committee. He's a former Marine who wants a "greatly reduced federal footprint in primary and secondary education," who "promises that the current system of

Online Review and Rating for Race to the Top High School Commencement Challenge Begins | The White House

Online Review and Rating for Race to the Top High School Commencement Challenge Begins | The White House

Online Review and Rating for Race to the Top High School Commencement Challenge Begins

Release Time:
For Immediate Release

Rating period ends Friday, April 29 at 11:59 PM ET

WASHINGTON – Public review and rating of the six high school finalists in the Race to the Top Commencement Challenge begins today and ends Friday, April 29 at 11:59 pm ET. Rating of the schools will be based on a short video from each school, produced with support from the Get Schooled Foundation, along with an essay on how each school is preparing its students to win the future and achieve the goal of having the highest proportion of college graduates in the world by 2020.

President Obama taped a video message encouraging the public to go towww.whitehouse.gov/commencement and rate the final six schools. Schools will be rated on a scale from 1 to 5 (with 5 being the best). The three schools with the highest average ratings will be announced on Monday, May

What It Takes To Lead a Fortune 500 Company, A Start-Up, and, Yes, Schools | Larry Cuban on School Reform and Classroom Practice

What It Takes To Lead a Fortune 500 Company, A Start-Up, and, Yes, Schools | Larry Cuban on School Reform and Classroom Practice

What It Takes To Lead a Fortune 500 Company, A Start-Up, and, Yes, Schools

Advice from leaders of successful corporations, sports teams, and school districts is like nectar for hummingbirds: sweet tasting but fleeting. A recent entry into the nectar-producing industry comes from The Corner Office where Adam Bryant interviewed more than 70 CEOs and leaders of non-profits representing “decades of collective experience … [who] learned firsthand what it takes to succeed.” For all of those boards of directors eager to choose their next CEO and school boards dithering over who the next crackerjack superintendent (Newark and Atlanta are searching) should be, here are the five qualities that Bryant distilled from his interviews:

Passionate Curiosity: [it is] “indispensable, no matter what the job is.You want somebody who is just alert and very awake and engaged with the world and wanting to know more.”

“In every business I’ve worked in, there’s been a lot of cost and value locked up in things that are deemed to be

Michelle Rhee - The 2011 TIME 100 - TIME

Michelle Rhee - The 2011 TIME 100 - TIME

Michelle Rhee

Michelle Rhee

PETER YANG/AUGUST

School can be an intimidating place, one in which competitiveness and power cliques can sometimes turn downright nasty — and not just for the kids. Michelle Rhee, 41, knows that as well as anyone — and has handled it better than most. The former chancellor of the Washington, D.C., school system and the founder of the Students First advocacy group, Rhee has distinguished herself by her single-mindedness and her dedication to kids.

Anyone who works in the political world quickly learns that personalities and competing agendas have a way of



Read more: http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,2066367_2066369_2066128,00.html #ixzz1KAbI3A7i

Reach 10 for Education - 10 Days, 10 Calls, 10 People #edFL #legFL

Reach 10 for Education in Jacksonville Florida - 10 Days, 10 Calls, 10 People


We have 10 days to make a difference. Just 10 days to tell our Legislature to Fund Education First, Cut it Last.

On Monday, April 25th, the Legislature begins the process of negotiating the Florida budget, and if they don’t hear from you the anticipated cuts to public schools could get worse. Tax cuts for corporations could get bigger on the backs of our schools.

Cuts to education have been coming for years. They are not new, they are not necessary, and they are NOT acceptable.

In a year when Tallahassee can give a tax break to companies like Expedia.com, how can we stay silent as they cut basic core services at public schools?

It is time for public education supporters to be heard. Call 10 friends and ask them to reach the 10 elected officials listed on this website.

We have just 10 days. The time is now. Call today.


Supported by:

50th No More - Helping Florida's Kids Get the Education They Deserve


Reach 10 - Call or Email our State's Elected Officials and Tell Them to Fund Education First, Cut it Last.

Call or email our state's elected officials and tell them to Fund Education First, Cut it Last!

  1. Governor Scott: 1-850-488-7146
    rick.scott@eog.myflorida.com
  2. Sen Haridopolos: President of Senate 1-850-487-5229
    haridopolos.mike.web@flsenate.gov
  3. Rep Cannon: Speaker of House 1-850-488-2742
    dean.cannon@myfloridahouse.gov
  4. Sen Wise: Education 1-850-487-5027
    wise.stephen.web@flsenate.gov
  5. Sen Simmons: Pre-K - 12 Appropriations 1-850-487-5050
    simmons.david.web@flsenate.gov
  6. Sen Alexander: Budget 1-850-487-5044
    alexander.jd.web@flsenate.gov
  7. Rep Grimsley: Joint Leg. Budget Commission 1-850-488-3457
    denise.grimsley@myfloridahouse.gov
  8. Rep Coley: Pre-K - 12 Appropriations 1-850-488-2873
    marti.coley@myfloridahouse.gov
  9. Rep Proctor: Education 1-850-488-2977
    bill.proctor@myfloridahouse.gov
  10. Rep Fresen: Ed. Competitiveness Subcomm. 1-850-488-4092
    erik.fresen@myfloridahouse.gov


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