Sunday, December 26, 2010

Christie's war on teachers needs some new tactics | mycentraljersey.com | MyCentralJersey.com

Christie's war on teachers needs some new tactics | mycentraljersey.com | MyCentralJersey.com

Christie's war on teachers needs some new tactics

DECEMBER 27, 2010

Enough already.

We get it. Everyone in the state gets it. Gov. Chris Christie hates the New Jersey Education Association. He believes the teachers union leaders are interested in nothing more than protecting their own interests, that they care little about students, taxpayers or anyone else, and that they have long been sacrificing the quality of New Jersey education at the altar of fat pay and benefits for the state's teachers.

And he wants us all to believe that he will be the one at long last to drive a stake through the NJEA demon.

Can we just move on already? Or will the governor not rest until every New Jerseyan — or at least every one of his supporters - believes that public school teachers and their luxurious taxpayer-funded lifestyles

Teacher Rankings, Once Internal, Are Now Questioned - NYTimes.com

Teacher Rankings, Once Internal, Are Now Questioned - NYTimes.com

Hurdles Emerge in Rising Effort to Rate Teachers

For the past three years, Katie Ward and Melanie McIver have worked as a team at Public School 321 in Park Slope, Brooklyn, teaching a fourth-grade class. But on the reports that rank the city's teachers based on their students’ standardized test scores, Ms. Ward’s name is nowhere to be found.

Ángel Franco/The New York Times

Melanie McIver, a teacher at Public School 321 in Park Slope, Brooklyn, with Elizabeth Phillips, background, the school principal. Both women have seen issues related to the city’s system of ranking teachers, which is at the heart of a lawsuit in State Supreme Court in Manhattan.

“I feel as though I don’t exist,” she said last Monday, looking up from playing a vocabulary game with her students.

Down the hall, Deirdre Corcoran, a fifth-grade teacher, received a ranking for a year when she was out on child-care leave. In three other classrooms at this highly ranked school, fourth-grade teachers were ranked among the worst in the city at teaching math, even though their students’ average score on the state math exam was close to four, the highest score.

“If I thought they gave accurate information, I would take them more seriously,” the principal of P.S. 321, Elizabeth Phillips, said about the rankings. “But some of my best teachers have the absolute worst scores,” she said, adding that she had based her

What a waste of a perfectly good blizzard. « Fred Klonsky's blog

What a waste of a perfectly good blizzard. « Fred Klonsky's blog

What a waste of a perfectly good blizzard.

I’m almost halfway through Winter Break.

After spending the last few days in New York with the family, we escaped what may become a major blizzard that is anticipated to drop as much as a foot and a half of snow on the city.

New York schools are closed anyway tomorrow, so there will be no Snow Day.

What a waste of a perfectly good blizzard.

As the storm followed closely behind us, Anne and I spent the day heading north up the Taconic Parkway then

Queens Teacher: Save Jamaica High!!!

Queens Teacher: Save Jamaica High!!!

Save Jamaica High!!!

Popout

Jamaica High School's school community in Queens rallies to keep their school open.

Teach your children - Crosby Stills Nash

Daily News editorial: New PAC in town; education reform is about to heat up - LA Daily News

Daily News editorial: New PAC in town; education reform is about to heat up - LA Daily News

Daily News editorial: New PAC in town; education reform is about to heat up


GIVEN the importance of California's public schools, you'd think the critical decisions that affect the education of our children would be debated and vetted with all due diligence in Sacramento. Unfortunately, that is not the case.

Votes on education policy are often determined by a single question asked in back rooms: Does the CTA support it?

Apparently, the unwritten rule is that if the California Teachers Association supports an education bill, then the Democrat-controlled Legislature can pass it. The reason? Money, lots of it. CTA is one of the biggest spenders on lobbying in Sacramento in the past decade, according to the California Fair Political Practices Commission. If the powerful CTA opposes a bill - or a candidate - it has the money to make sure it goes away.

So says termed-out state Sen. Gloria Romero, who championed education reform such as the Parent Trigger Law while serving as chairwoman of the Senate's Education Committee. She should know; she was pounded

“Where you are standing now is a cliff edge…” « Failing Schools

“Where you are standing now is a cliff edge…” « Failing Schools

“Where you are standing now is a cliff edge…”

DECEMBER 26, 2010
by Sabrina

“…and there’s a cold wind blowing.”

An insightful group of students from Jamaica High School and Queens Collegiate recently wrote a play about school reform in New York City, inspired by the Greek tragedy “Antigone.” The students were all set to stage their production, but administrators– worried about the implications of their powerful critique of local “reform” efforts– decided to ban the play. So much for the First Amendment…

You can read reports of the situation at The Huffington Post and on The Answer Sheet. Full text of the play is included below.

Declassified: Struggle for Existence (We Used to Eat Lunch Together)

Conceived of by students from Jamaica High School and Queens Collegiate High School

NYC Education Reform Controversy: Do Smaller Schools Mean Success?

NYC Education Reform Controversy: Do Smaller Schools Mean Success?

NYC Education Reform Controversy: Do Smaller Schools Mean Success?


First Posted: 12-26-10 02:49 PM | Updated: 12-26-10 02:56 PM

What's Your Reaction:

Chancellor Joel Klein of New York City has implemented a school reform strategy that aims to exchange large, underperforming schools with smaller schools. To date, 26 schools with high dropout rates have been closed and, since, graduation rates in the city have risen 10 percent.

Despite some of the strategy's successes, there are many who are discontented with the outcome -- hundreds of high school students left without a school to attend. Students who were left out in the transition -- including international and special education students -- were then forced to move to the few remaining high-capacity schools, only passing on the original problem.

PBS NEWSHOUR reports:

Chancellor Klein, who retires in January, says that change is controversial, and that there

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