Tuesday, August 10, 2010

“Pay to play” in the East Bay? The Education Report

The Education Report

“Pay to play” in the East Bay?

By Katy Murphy
Tuesday, August 10th, 2010 at 11:35 am in athletics/physical education, students

pay to playCalifornia’s public schools can’t legally require students to pay for uniforms, transportation or other costs of extracurricular activities, but some do anyway.
Last week, the San Diego Union-Tribune reported that some schools in San Diego Unified were asking students to pay for uniforms and other expenses associated with extracurricular activities, even though the California Supreme Court ruled in 1984 that the practice violates state law.
The ACLU is also conducting a probe of other California schools that might require kids to pay for medical examinations, gear, Advanced Placement examinations, coaches and other expenses, according to California Watch.
The high school district in Brentwood (Contra Costa County) charges students for some activities, but it might revise its policies in light of the San Diego situation,

School Tech Connect: Jan Chimes In

School Tech Connect: Jan Chimes In

Jan Chimes In

I know very few people in Washington, and I've never felt like I understood the sausage-making that goes on there in the legislative process. I do know my Congresswoman, though, and I take her at her word.

CHARTER SCHOOL SCANDALS: Algiers Charter School Association

CHARTER SCHOOL SCANDALS: Algiers Charter School Association


Algiers Charter School Association

ALGIERS PARENTS AND PASTORS SUE ALGIERS CHARTER SCHOOL ASSOCIATION; OPEN MEETINGS LAW VIOLATED, PLAINTIFFS SAY, JUNE 3, 2009, The Louisiana Justice Institute

As part of its "Project Transparency: NOW YOU KNOW" campaign, Louisiana Justice Institute (LJI), on behalf of several local ministers and parent representatives, filed suit against the Algiers Charter School Association and its Board of Trustees for holding two "invitation only" public meetings--on May 19 and May 21, 2009--in violation of the Louisiana Open Meetings Law.

Some California schools make kids 'pay to play' extracurriculars, though it's not legal - Inside Bay Area

Some California schools make kids 'pay to play' extracurriculars, though it's not legal - Inside Bay Area


Some California schools make kids 'pay to play' extracurriculars, though it's not legal
Know of any public schools in the East Bay that charge students fees to play sports, music?

Education News - The New York Times


Pulling an All-Nighter for the College Application

Cree Bautista was the first high school student to submit a Common Application to his first choice, N.Y.U., early on Aug. 1.
Ben Sklar for The New York Times
Cree Bautista was the first high school student to submit a Common Application to his first choice, N.Y.U., early on Aug. 1.
As more students each year seek to get the earliest possible jump on their applications, deans of admission are sounding a cautionary note: a premium is placed on thoughtfulness, not speed.

House Passes $26 Billion in State Aid

The House interrupted its summer recess to approve $26 billion in aid to school districts and states to prevent large-scale layoffs of teachers and public employees.

Inexperienced Companies Chase U.S. School Funds

Dozens of companies with little or no experience turning around schools are competing for billions in federal funds.
At the Borough of Manhattan Community College, Sharasha Croslen attends a remedial math class for incoming freshmen.

Schools Are Given a Grade on How Graduates Do

The New York City Department of Education is acknowledging that many graduates lack basic skills and is trying to do something about it.
President Obama was welcomed by Gov. Rick Perry of Texas on Monday at the Austin airport.

Obama Calls for U.S. to Lead in Graduation

President Obama, at the University of Texas, called for the nation to lead the world in college graduation.

New Wave of Iranians Seek U.S. Studies

Despite tensions between the U.S. and Iran, students in Iran are increasingly enrolling in American colleges.
ON EDUCATION
From left, Sylvia Yamamoto, Tulani Husband-Verbeek, Courtney Johnson, Lillian Pinet, Heather Gorman, Ben Rockoff, Lisa Goncalves and Ana Vaisenstein have been placed in Teach Plus-affiliated Boston schools.

Lesson Plan in Boston Schools: Don’t Go It Alone

Instead of principals hiring teachers individually, three schools have assembled teams of experienced teachers to anchor their schools and work with new teachers.

Congress Passes Bill to Provide $10 Billion to Support 160,000 Education Jobs jobs saved for each state. [PDU.S. Dept of Education

Congress Passes Bill to Provide $10 Billion to Support 160,000 Education Jobs Nationwide | U.S. Department of Education

Congress Passes Bill to Provide $10 Billion to Support 160,000 Education Jobs Nationwide

President Signs Bill Into Law

Contact:
Press Office, (202) 401-2310, press@ed.gov


Today, by vote of 247-161, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill to provide $10 billion to support an estimated 160,000 education jobs nationwide and another $16 billion to help states fund Medicaid budgets. The U.S. Senate passed the bill last Thursday by a vote of 61-39. This evening, the President signed the bill into law.
"With the support of the jobs bill, these educators will be helping our children learn instead of looking for work," Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said. "This is the right thing to do for our children, for our teachers, and for our economy."
Over the last two years, the Education Department has been able to support 300,000 education jobs through stimulus funding provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. At this time, seven states have drawn down 100 percent of previously allocated jobs funding, while 18 states total have drawn down 80 percent or more. A July report from the independent Center on Education Policy found that 75 percent of school districts that received stimulus funds expect to cut teaching positions in the upcoming school year.
The $10 billion fund will support education jobs in the 2010-11 school year and be distributed to states by a formula based on population figures. States can distribute their funding to school districts based on their own primary funding formula or districts' relative share of federal Title I funds.
In order to ensure that states receive funding as quickly as possible, the Department will streamline the application process so that states can submit applications within days. The Department will award funding to states within two weeks of their submission of an approvable application.

Announcing The Great July Giveaway Winner

Announcing The Great July Giveaway Winner



Announcing The Great July Giveaway Winner
  • Architects of Change

08/10/10 | The Women's Conference | 0 Comments
minervaawards2009minerva seal2
As a woman, what personal freedom do you value most?
For our Great July Giveaway, in honor of Independence Day, we asked you to share the personal freedom you value most. You responded with creativity, humor, wisdom and a great deal of thought.
Responses ranged from the freedom to be feminine, to the freedom to choose – anything and everything that life has to offer, to the freedom to marry, to the freedom to work and raise a family, to the freedom to vote -- and more.
We’ve chosen our winning response (who will receive 2 tickets to the conference, the chance to interview Robert Redford, and a meet-and-greet with Maria Shriver) and three honorable mentions, below. We urge you to explore more of the responses here – the range and creativity of which are truly remarkable.
Winner
Estella Owoimaha, 20s:
I value my freedom to defy gravity and create change. I can do so because great women have set great examples. I can be black, female, mother, lesbian, warrior and poet if I wanted to

School Tech Connect: In Which I Coin The Term "EduStarve"

School Tech Connect: In Which I Coin The Term "EduStarve"

In Which I Coin The Term "EduStarve"

Not sure how these two statements can be in the same article without a little follow-up.

Ok, so.... they found $12

Remainders: One teacher’s gratitude for standardized testing | GothamSchools

Remainders: One teacher’s gratitude for standardized testing | GothamSchools

Remainders: One teacher’s gratitude for standardized testing

  • One teacher’s falling test scores make her thankful, and vow to work harder. (Year Seven)
  • A new jobs site from The After School Corporation helps educators find work. (Insideschools)
  • There’s no conspiracy to privatize in the business-minded schooling trend. (Larry Cuban)
  • A push to train principals according to the ages of children they work with. (Early Ed Watch)
  • Formative vs. summative tests? One’s a checkup, the other an autopsy. (Ed News Colorado)
  • KIPP’s summit included galas, awards, and young scholars. (Vimeo)
  • New Jersey is tightening its pre-K rules and focusing on poor families. (Hechinger)
  • A political opponent of Michael Bennet’s pitched that Times story. (Politico)
  • Arne Duncan will get the edujobs money out as fast as he can. (Politics K12, GS)
  • The definitive difference between apples and oranges: a cartoon explainer. (Kids Are Dumb)

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Eduwonk � Blog Archive � Current Events

Eduwonk � Blog Archive � Current Events

Current Events

Guest post by Jim Ryan
Two stories of interest in today’s NYT. First, there is a front-page story about the mad rush by companies to get federal money for helping to turn around failing schools.
As the headline (in the print edition) says, “School Reform Draws Crowd, Not Credentials.” One company promises to help schools by “facilitating new conversations through story listening, expressing empathy, appreciative inquiry and design thinking.” I’m sure some of these turnaround companies have great ideas

Want to help us stay alive and get better? Please take a survey | GothamSchools

Want to help us stay alive and get better? Please take a survey | GothamSchools

Want to help us stay alive and get better? Please take a survey

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These are scary times for the journalism business, and yet we wake up every day wanting to do good journalism, and you come here wanting to read it.
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I’ve already asked you for money. Now, in a new survey that you can find here and that will take just five minutes, I request your information.
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Federal teacher jobs bill set to channel about $200 million to city | GothamSchools

Federal teacher jobs bill set to channel about $200 million to city | GothamSchools

Federal teacher jobs bill set to channel about $200 million to city

President Barack Obama is expected to sign a $10 billion federal teacher jobs bill into law this evening, opening the way for New York City to receive about $200 million for teacher salaries.
The “edujobs” legislation is meant to stave off teacher layoffs. But in New York City, Mayor Michael Bloomberg avoided layoffs by revoking planned teacher pay raises, leaving the use of the $200 million unclear. The law requires that districts use the funds to pay for teachers salaries and benefits — not

"We started the Small Schools Workshop back in 1991 at UIC..." Mike Klonsky... #education #parents

Mike Klonsky...


"We started the Small Schools Workshop back in 1991 at UIC..."

School reform...Race To the Top...Unions...privatization...


WEDNESDAY, JULY 07, 2010


Reviewed in "Improving Schools"

Michael and Susan Klonsky (2008) Small Schools: Public School

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