Wednesday, April 25, 2018

School Climate and Safety. Civil Rights Data Collection | U.S. Department of Education

U.S. Department of Education Releases 2015-16 Civil Rights Data Collection | U.S. Department of Education:

School Climate and Safety. Civil Rights Data Collection



Washington — The U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights (OCR) today released the 2015-16 Civil Rights Data Collection (CRDC). This data, which is self-reported by 17,300 public school districts and 96,400 public schools and educational programs, is collected and published biennially by OCR.
Since 1968, the federal government has collected civil rights data about schools. For the first time, the 2015-16 CRDC report includes comprehensive data regarding incidents of criminal offenses in our nation's public schools. It also includes several new categories of data on Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) course taking.
"Protecting all students' civil rights is at the core of the Department's mission," said U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos. "We are pleased to produce the CRDC in a way that it can be reviewed, analyzed and utilized by local, state and federal education leaders. I want to commend the many educators, school leaders and OCR staff who put in countless hours to produce this data and who work tirelessly to ensure all students are able to learn in a safe and nurturing environment free from discrimination."
The Department used CRDC data to produce topic-specific data briefs on two major topics: STEM Course Taking and School Climate and Safety.
The full CRDC data set is available at: https://www2.ed.gov/ocr/docs/crdc-2015-16.html

 U.S. Department of Education Releases 2015-16 Civil Rights Data Collection | U.S. Department of Education:


School attendance: A building block of student achievement

School attendance: A building block of student achievement:

School attendance: A building block of student achievement



Although most schools have daily attendance rates of well over 90 percent, according to the newly released U.S. Department of Education Civil Rights Data Collection (CRDC),  about 8 million students in the United States missed more than three weeks of school during the 2015–16 school year (CRDC 2015–16). This represents an increase over the 6.8 million students who missed more than three weeks of school during the 2013–14 school year. These students were chronically absent.
The building block that must be in place to meet student achievement and high school graduation goals is attendance. Physically being present in school is one of the most basic conditions for a student’s success – if students are not in school, they are not learning what is being taught and could be falling behind in earning the course credits needed to graduate.
In a new video, I use building blocks to illustrate the ways in which poor attendance impacts both chronically absent students and their classmates with better attendance.


What should schools focus on to improve student outcomes?
As background, in the past two decades of school accountability, policies have directed schools to improve on key indicators of student success. No Child Left Behind (NCLB; 2002) required schools to improve student achievement on reading and math as well as increase high school graduation rates. The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA; 2015) changed the national structure of NCLB by empowering states to design and implement their own accountability systems. In addition to test-based academic metrics, and, for high schools, graduation rates, ESSA requires states to hold schools accountable for at least one measure of “school quality or student success (SQSS).”
In a 2016 Hamilton Project strategy paper, we recommended that states choose to hold schools accountable for reducing rates of chronic absenteeism as a state’s SQSS metric under ESSA. Since then, 36 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico have chosen to hold schools accountable for reducing rates of chronic absenteeism through their state-led accountability plans.School attendance: A building block of student achievement:


 School attendance: A building block of student achievement:

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